Black Pride is Same Gender Loving Pride …

Although It’s the end of August and the performative parade of appreciation of Pride has long ended, we need to talk about the intersection of Blackness and the LGBTQ+ community. We need to acknowledge boys, girls, non-binary, and trans people who love other girls, boys, non-binary, and trans people. More importantly, we need to realize much of the groundwork done in our communities has been done by Black LGBTQ+ people.

June is Pride month. In that month, we see a confetti like burst of “solidarity” for LGBTQ+/ same gender loving folks. When the rainbow confetti is swept away and the flag flooded with colors comes down, it leaves the question of “so now what?” Especially after the continued and senseless violence enacted upon transwomen and the erasure of transmen.

Before any of you decide to snub your nose at celebrating pride or LGBTQ people, ask yourself these questions:

“Do I love to watch Pose or RuPaul’s drag race?”

“Do I say shade, read, the gag?”

“Do I sympathize with civil or uncivil disobedience?”

“Do I say sickening? Do I say realness, fish, or serving?”

If you answered yes to any of those questions then welcome to the celebration because you owe all of those things to the community. Especially the Black LGBTQ community!

Black people are trendsetters. We are the backbone of this society and have worked to create a culture that is our own. In doing that, Black LGBTQ+ people created a culture because there was a divide created in our community. Black people have adopted patriarchy and other Eurocentric ideals that have damaged our relationships with each other. We have othered a group of people within our community. Eurocentrism promotes othering and having a lower group to enact power over. Eurocentrism also encourages heteronormative societies while establishing gender roles to be followed. When we have people who don’t fit that structure, othering happens.

“Disagreeing with their lifestyle,” is an invalid, ignorant statement. A lifestyle is a choice. A lifestyle is something you can change. It’s a way of “styling” your life. Health and fitness is a lifestyle. Being “outdoorsy” is a lifestyle. LGBTQ+ people don’t go through life as heterosexual, then randomly one day wake up and say, “… it’s Saturday. I think … I think I’m going to be gay today.” That’s not how it works. People usually know they aren’t heterosexual or cisgendered early in their lives. We usually ignore children or shame them into hiding their true selves. We must stop this. We are causing detriments in our culture and denying the importance of our people in history when we do. We can’t beat, pray, or force people to change who they are to make others comfortable and we shouldn’t want to.

They are several people that made contributions in our community that are Black and LGBTQ+ . We have:

•Bayard Rustin

•James Baldwin

•Ernestine Eckstein

•Alvin Ailey

•Audre Lorde

•Andrea Jenkins

•Willi Ninja

•Angela Davis

•Marsha P. Johnson

There are so many more people that we could and should acknowledge in our community that created space and opportunity for Black people. We need to stop othering and exile homophobia from our communities and our lives. We should not be asking Black people to choose between their identities because intersectionality exist. Stop asking, “Are you Black first or are you [insert orientation or gender identity] first?” Learn the difference between orientation and gender. Learn/ educate yourself on the topic of gender or the social construct that it is. Your opinions about a person’s preferred pronoun doesn’t matter. Call them by their preferred pronouns.

We have many issues plaguing our communities. It’s time to retire homophobia and transphobia.

The Pen is Mightier Than The Sword: A Conversation with A Poet

Baltimore is a hub for artistry. We have musicians, painters, writers, and of course poets. One poet in particular has created a name for herself through words and select readings of her work. Her work is ” [a] getaway from the world ” and healing for the poet. 

Meet Ashley Elizabeth, the writer and teacher with a knack for storytelling through verse for over a decade. Ashley started writing fiction in elementary school, poems in seventh grade, and creative non-fiction in college. She creates glimpses into the world with her work. Her poetry as she described are ” more condensed version of that story that packs that story in a small, vibrant punch.” Ashley Elizabeth’s most recent work is her first published book titled, “you were supposed to be a friend.”

you-were-supposed-to-be-a-friend-glory

It is a collection of delicate yet tough realities about the brutalities of unrequited love. It’s vulnerable. It’s soft. It’s true. It’s definitely worth the read. Ashley gave us insight to what it’s like to be a teacher and poet.

What is your full name?
My name is Ashley Evans
Do you have a poet/author name?
My poet name is Ashley Elizabeth.
When did you start writing?
I started writing fiction in elementary school, poetry in middle school, and creative nonfiction in college.
How do you define writing? Poetry? How would you define your poetry?
I define writing as putting pen to paper (or fingers to keys) and telling a story in a way only you know how to tell. Poetry is a more condensed version of that story that packs that story in a small, vibrant punch. My poetry is a little of this a little of that. I write about different topics, such as blackness, womanhood, family, abuse, and more. It’s my getaway from the world when I cannot physically get away. It’s my release; it’s my healing.
How long have you been a poet?
I’ve been writing poetry since about 7th or 8th grade, so that’s around 12-13 years or so.
What inspires you (to write)?
My community inspires me to write, my pure existence as a black woman. The love I have for my partner. The hate I have for oppression. The secrets I have, the constant thoughts running through my head. My trauma is definitely up there on the list as well. Murky relationships between family and non-family members.
How did you start doing readings?
I started doing readings by simply responding to calls for writers and being lucky enough to be chosen. My very first reading was with Yellow Arrow Publishing in April 2018 after I responded to a call for writers who write about Baltimore. From a couple readings, I have been solicited to do other readings.
Tell us about Ashley, outside of writing.
Outside of writing, I am a teacher at a Montessori school in Baltimore. I am also a freelance writing consultant/editor/proofreader. I live in my partner in Baltimore County, and when I’m not writing, I’m looking for great spots to eat and experience life, reading, or playing video games.
When and why did you become a teacher?
Originally, I did not want to teach at all. I have a psychology degree, but an experience I had teaching in Jamaica, available through my university, changed my mind completely. The students were bright and eager. They wanted to learn, and I wanted to keep sharing my gifts and knowledge when I came back to the States. After I graduated, I landed a job teaching in Baltimore City, and I’ve been in education in some way ever since.
Does being a write help you as a teacher? Do you incorporate writing into your teaching style?
I wouldn’t necessarily say it makes me a better teacher, but it does make me a better processor in evaluating needs of my students. I have both creative writing and more academic work structured into my classroom routines as both are important for different reasons.
Who inspired you to teach?
My kids in Jamaica and all the amazing teachers I’ve had along the way, especially the late Ms. Nevel. I wish I just had one more day with her.
Who is your favorite writer?
That’s a tough question. I like the work of many people as everyone brings something new to the table, and I appreciate the variety greatly.
Do you have a favorite book? if so, what is it?
Not really, that’s like picking a favorite child, and that’s sacrilegious in my line of work. I just really love to read. The most current book I’ve read that had me feeling all the feels was The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas. That is definitely high on my list.
Do you have any advice for aspiring writer and teachers?
To aspiring writers: Keep writing no matter what. There will be times you want to give up and get rejections from submissions/residencies and be the bridesmaid but never the bride, but do not let that stop you. Keep writing and reading and working towards however you define success as a writer. It will come. Try to write everyday, but know that it is okay to put a piece down for a nap and come back to it later. For teachers: Teach the new generation to the best of your ability (obviously) but also listen to them. believe in them. Hug them when you can. All they need is love and support. Know that you may not be able to reach all of your students, but try your damnedest.
If you could anywhere in the world, where would you go and why?
Right now, I’d go back to Jamaica, but I would only stay in the home stay I stayed in the first time I went. There’s something about the summertime that makes this non-beach girl want to go to the beach, eat some amazing food, dance, and not have a care in the world. (Ask me this again later, and you might have a completely different answer.)
Ashley is actively writing, reading, and tweeting. Keep up with her updates via Instagram or Twitter.

5 Nonviolent Ways To Get Back At Your Ex

Here’s a short list of petty ways to get back at your ex that won’t land you in jail. Somebody needs it, so let’s get into it:

1.       Take Your New Boo To Their Barber Or Loctitcian 

That’s right. This is a full-on violation of a sacred space! What is more disrespectful than sending your new partner to the person who does your old bae’s hair? Especially if new boo gets out of the chair right before old boo and peeps what old boo’s true hairline is looking like between cuts. Yikes. 

2.       Cancel That Flight They’re Bragging About On Instagram

This only works if they forgot to leave the confirmation number off their post. That’s the only piece of information you need to cancel a flight, so if you have that, you have your revenge.

3.       Take A Brick To Their Car

Before you go busting the windows out of their car, consider simply gluing the brick to the windshield instead. Imagine how hard you’ll laugh at the thought of them driving around with a whole brick stuck to their car, struggling to figure out who did it and how. They’ll likely end up having to replace the windshield anyway if you use the right kind of adhesive, so maybe save this for the ex who did you the dirtiest. Up to you. 

4.       Submit Their Resume To Phony Job Postings Online

This will have multiple scammers calling and emailing them with useless information forever. Like…forever. 

5.       Take Their Pet To The Shelter

This is pretty low, but that’s the point. Anybody can drop a dog or cat off at their local SPCA. They usually charge a surrender fee, but it’ll be less than the adoption fee your ex will have to pay to get their precious fur baby back. To be extra petty, you can leave the details in a note in the hallway signed in the pet’s name.

Try not to do anything that will have you looking crazy on the news. It’s normal to be angry at a partner after a break-up, and it is even more normal to struggle with being the bigger person. If you find yourself needing to take a final jab at the person who just broke your heart, find a non-literal way to do it. Comment below with the pettiest things you’ve done or experienced after a break-up. Help keep another grieving sister or brother off of The Shade Room!

Artist Turned Scientist Back to Artist

“Baltimore is the city that broke me and birthed me in the same breath,” a quote from the emerging writer, rapper, and scientist currently known as 1202 Duece Lee (born Daniel Chapman). Baltimore was his home for a little over a decade. The city became a character in his life, adding to experiences that became inspirations. Despite tough times, Duece manages to keep a humorous and lighthearted outlook on life.

Although, Duece Lee was not born in Baltimore, his time and artistic stamp has made him apart of the artistic community and he is an artist that we will happily claim. After attending the prestigious Baltimore Polytechnic Institute (yes, I am a fellow Poly grad and will fever hype it up) he went on to Harrisburg University. He studied science alongside publishing two children’s books and Youtube project called “Projection” (a SciFi series read by Duece himself).

In addition, Duece tried his hand at establishin an arts community, and now a publishing company. The publishing company will promote self publishing and keeping most of your rights as the author. We had the opportunity to have a word with the author and rapper.

Tell us about you. Who are you? 

This question I fear more than anything in the world. I am Daniel Chapman, III. I am a representation of a legacy my grandfather left behind. 

What is your writer name or rap name? How did you choose that? 

I like this question. My writer name is 1202 Duece Lee. Though I do rap, I identify my artistic presence in writing any and everything I can experience. Duece was actually a nickname I adopted when I was 10 for myself. My older cousin called himself Ace and I just looked up to him so much. Note that Duece is spelled wrong. (Did I mention I was 10). I started off doing music under the Pseudonym Danny Duece credited to my older brothers bestfriend / my big brother T. Dot Sinz. Recently it got its final change to Duece Lee with a suggestion from my older brother, a fun play on my original moniker and middle name. I actually am a huge fan of Bruce Lee so I enjoyed the playfulness. The 1202 is the most important part, though. Many authors in “ye olden times”; namely women authors, wrote under Pseudonyms initialed to hide their gender. Many writers still use the initiating hack because it markets better to a specific audience. 1202 is my anniversary date and the most important number to me, but that’s another story. I am not pandering to a specific audience so I don’t want my name marketed to one. I try to write stories, or poems, or songs that are real experiences. Things anyone regardless of race, religion, gender or background can read and pick out SOMETHING that makes them fall in love with wanting to open their hearts a little bit more. 

Where are you from? How did you move to Baltimore? 

I’m from Newark, Delaware. My mom is from Baltimore and moved us there to search for her Dad when I was 7. He died a few years prior. 

How long were you in the city? 

I lived in the city for the following 11 years. 

Why did you leave Baltimore? 

I left Baltimore for growth. I love the city like no other, but recognized I wasn’t going to be able to grow into a properly functioning adult while still living in my trauma, so I left. 

You are a musician, writer, and scientist. How did you come into music, writing, and science? How did all these things become part of you? 

I’m a religious soul and deep thinker. Something in my heart when I was young told me to pursue what made me feel whole and never look back. I don’t feel whole not doing all of these things. 

How difficult is it to exist in all those spaces and make them work? How do you find time for all of the projects? 

I have to find a way to blend them at times to make them work, but not so difficult. They allow me to exercise all parts of my brain without over stimulating. I write sci fi shorts to keep up on different topics in the community, but write passionately on whatever inspires me. Many of our famous scientists were inventors as well as artists. I think science and art are much more closely related than people allow them to be. 

Does the scientific part of you ever influence or coincide with your creative projects? 

Why, yes! Lol. Inspired a whole novel. 

How long have you been a musician? 

Ive been trying my hand at music for abt 10 years. 

How long have you been a writer? 

I’ve been writing for about 15 years. 

How did you get your start? 

I started by writing a pretty sappy love (what I thought was a haiku) after joining poetry club in 5th grade… I got made fun of but it made me want to get so much better. And I fell in love from there. 

How did (or does) Baltimore influenced you? How did the city or its people shape you? 

The city helped me realize that people’s experiences are not being told. That no matter what I should keep pushing for my voice to be heard, because in the end, it’s not really just my voice. 

What inspires you to write? What inspires you to make music? 

I’m thoroughly inspired by the creativity of others. 

What are you currently working on? What was the inspiration behind that? 

Got a little novel I’ve been working on called “Projection.” It started off as a way for me to explain to my fiance all the things that run through my mind of how I feel we were meant to find each other. I’m a deeply religious guy but have studied a lot of different philosophies to try and expand my mind and fell in love with how similar a lot of the worlds philosophies are. Everything surrounds one deal, true and honest love. But I think we as humans have a very hard time with that… so I kinda wanted to write my take on that ideal. 

Walk us through the creative process for you. 

I am always in writing mode. Whenever inspiration strikes, I write without hesitation or doubt. I write until I feel the inspiration has run its course, and then I don’t look at it for a few days lol, come back and see if it’s something that needs more or sometimes even, less. 

What do you miss about Baltimore? 

I miss half and halfs like the real kind. Not that Arnold Palmer bullshit. 

Would you return to this city? Why or why not? 

I hope to one day. And because the city needs people in it who truly love it. It goes back to my projection ideology. If you don’t TRULY love something, then you are only hurting all parties involved. Be where your heart takes you… It actually does know a little more than your brain imo

What’s next for you? What are your ultimate goals/ aspirations? 

Welp, next is med school and hopefully becoming a best selling author. Maybe.

We hope to read more books and listen to more episodes of “Projection.” Keep up with Duece’s projects via Instagram, music via Soundcloud, and more of his writing on Vocal.

Why Community Policing Won’t Work

One summer evening, a sizable group of Black men gathered outside a mosque in a quiet, west Baltimore neighborhood. Their mission was simple: create a Black neighborhood watch organization to protect their own community. To end their reliance on hateful, often violent outsiders for the “protection” of their home. As usual, there were no weapons and the noise level was low considering the amount of people gathering. The idea was that the presence of this group would deter any negative activity in the neighborhood by letting people know that, finally, they were being protected by an organization that shared their interests. The men proudly marched block to block so their people could see them and they would see their people. This was the community policing initiative we’ve all been tweeting about for the last five years, and it was an incredibly powerful moment. Then the police showed up.

Now it’s important to note that the police didn’t just show up because their police senses started tingling. They were called by someone from the very community these men came out to defend. Someone looked out of their window, saw this group of Black men walking through the streets, and immediately assumed they had ill intentions. It likely never occurred to this person to simply ask the men what they were doing.

Community policing can’t work because people are too afraid of their own neighbors. We do not trust each other and honestly feel safer calling the police for small offenses than directly communicating our grievances. It is time to check ourselves and ask if we are actually ready to take responsibility for our own communities. And if we aren’t, we need to prepare ourselves by starting on an individual level.

You want to see us policing, or rather protecting, ourselves? Next time one of your neighbors is letting off fireworks and keeping you up until midnight, challenge yourself to knock on their door and express your concerns. Don’t be afraid to get a negative or confrontational reaction. Stop assuming the worst of people. Conflict is a necessary step in community building, and it is definitely preferable to the tragic scenarios that so often follow police involvement. Community policing can’t just be a group of selected men and women charged with guarding our streets. It must begin with us each having enough respect and trust in our people to take responsibility for our interactions with each other. How can we demand the opportunity to defend our own community if we don’t already believe the people around us are worth defending?